Sunday, December 23, 2012

Pine Needle Tea

Pine Needle Tea Recipe

With cold & flu season approaching Pine Needle Tea is a gift of health as well as an enjoyable experience.   And since Pine is best used fresh, it's a perfect excuse to get out & enjoy the change of seasons!



Pine Needle Tea has long been a favorite of traditional and indigenous peoples, both for it's refreshment and for it's medicinal values.

You may not realize that Pine Needle Tea contains 4-5 times the Vitamin C of fresh-squeezed orange juice, and is high in Vitamin A. It is also an expectorant (thins mucus secretions), decongestant, and can be used as an antiseptic wash when cooled. So not only does it taste good, but it's good for you!
Each varietal of pine has it's own flavor to impart, so experiment and see which needles you like best. And feel free to mix and match!

Just remember that while all Pines are evergreens, not all evergreens are Pines! So head out to the back yard or park, positively identify your pine trees, bring back some needles and give this one a try!  

Step-by-step Instructions for Making Pine Needle Tea:

1.  Collect a small bundle of green needles, the younger the better. (A small handful will be plenty.)
2.  Remove any of the brown, papery sheaths that may remain at the base of the needles. (They just pull right off.)
3. Chop the needles into small bits, about ¼ to ½ inch long.

For a Refreshing Tea: 
  1. Heat about a cup of water to just before boiling.
  2. Pour the hot water over about a tablespoon of the chopped needles.
  3. Allow to steep (preferably covered) for 5-10 minutes, until the majority of needles have settled to the bottom of the cup. Enjoy your delicious tea!
 For a Medicinal Tea:
    (This process releases more of the oils & resins that contain the medicinal compounds, and tastes a little like turpentine.) 

  1. Bring about a cup of water to a full boil. Add approximately one tablespoon of chopped needles to the boiling water and cover. Allow the needles to boil in the water for 2-3 minutes.
  2. Remove from heat and allow the tea to continue to steep, covered, until it is cool enough to drink. (Most of the needles should sink to the bottom.) Pour the tea into a mug, leaving the needles behind, and enjoy!
  3. Drink this tea several times a day for maximum medicinal effect. (Make it fresh each time.)  

Cheers!


SOURCE:     http://www.meganstiver.com/pine-needle-tea/blog_tea/
             and   http://homesteadsurvival.blogspot.com/2012/11/how-to-make-pine-needle-tea.html

Saturday, December 1, 2012

PLANTS - AIR PURIFIERS


As winter descends on the Northern hemisphere, our windows stay closed and the air becomes stale. 

Natural 6 Air Purifying House Plants

1. Bamboo Palm: According to NASA, it removes formaldahyde and is also said to act as a natural humidifier.

2. Snake Plant: Found by NASA to absorb nitrogen oxides and formaldahyde.

3. Areca Palm: One of the best air purifying plants for general air cleanliness.

4. Spider Plant: Great indoor plant for removing carbon monoxide and other toxins or impurities. Spider plants are one of three plants NASA deems best at removing formaldahyde from the air.

5. Peace Lily: Peace lilies could be called the “clean-all.” They’re often placed in bathrooms or laundry rooms because they’re known for removing mold spores. Also know to remove formaldahyde and trichloroethylene.

6. Gerbera Daisy: Not only do these gorgeous flowers remove benzene from the air, they’re known to improve sleep by absorbing carbon dioxide and giving off more oxygen over night.

SOURCE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_air-filtering_plants